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Tag Archives: Global Brand Guy

Ten Thoughts On How To Develop High Performing Teams – Leadership

Post first published 2/27/13 in the “MENG Blend” on the Marketing Executives Networking Group website – www.mengonline.com.  The destination site for leading marketing executives looking to stay ahead of the curve.  We have more than 1800 of the leading marketing minds in the world eager to meet, communicate, help and share our expertise.

Ten Thoughts On How To Develop High Performing Teams

Team Graphic

The word “team” has been used a lot in organizational motivational materials in recent years.  However, there is big difference between just a group of people calling themselves a “team” vs. a high performing one.  A team that doesn’t perform or work well together will, in most cases, not be able to help the organization achieve their objectives.  Moreover, de-moralizing team leadership can result in pushing all decision-making upwards to avoid “getting into trouble” and stifle new ideas.  I’ve been fortunate over the years in leading many cross-functional teams in multi-million dollar consumer product businesses.  So I’d thought I’d share with you my 10 ideas on how to develop high performing teams.

1.   Encourage “outside the box” thinking:

It’s important not to tell your team members “how” to do things.  Just establish the “goal line” and make sure they get any help they need.  Moreover, it’s also important you teach/train your team members on how to think “outside the box” to help them look at problems from many different points of view.  This is how seasoned leaders think and it’s a skill that can be taught.  It starts by asking different types of questions to uncover any gaps in team members thinking about the problem.  This helps to get your team to think.

2.   Delegate till it hurts:

The only way team members will grow if they learn by their mistakes as well as successes.  If you micro-manage all it will do is push ALL decision-making up to your level and they will never grow.  You can provide direction on what’s “in/out” of bounds, but don’t do the work for them.  My motto is “It’s OK to make a mistake; just don’t make the same mistake twice”.

3.   Be open to new ways of thinking:

Yes, you’ve been successful or you wouldn’t have been made team leader in the first place.  However, as Albert Einstein so cleverly stated “We can’t solve our problems with the same level of thinking that created them”.  So don’t be insecure to think you know everything – you don’t.  In addition, ask for volunteers with new ideas.  They will be most motivated to come up with new ideas and/or thinking.  This helps with idea #1.

4.   Never talk down to your team members:

Even if you think you know everything, never talk down to team members to show them how smart you are.  The workplace is not a forum on who’s the smartest.  It’s more about learning, letting go, performing, and motivating others to do great work.  Moreover, who wants to perform for someone who is always talking down to them?  Team members have feelings just like you.

5.   Give credit where credit is due:

While you are responsible for the ultimate product of your team, be sure you never “steal” their work.  Nothing demoralizes team members faster than bosses claiming their work as their own.  Don’t worry, you’ll get credit for your team’s work since your boss will give YOU credit for leading the team that came up with the idea in the first place.  That’s leadership.

6.   Promote your team members:

Be an advocate of your team.  Support and promote their work throughout the organization.  Remember, their work is a direct reflection of your leadership.  If you promote your team you will get promoted in the long run.  Moreover, you will build solid relationships with your team members for life.  They will remember how you promoted them and thus they will promote you – especially when you’re not looking.

7.   You must be authentic:

Everyone wants to be liked.  This means you need to be “real” and listen to your team members concerns and issues – even if you don’t really have the time.  You need to make time.  Moreover, no one wants to be “sold” or coerced into thinking you’re someone you’re not.  People can easily spot a phony and this leads to mistrust and ill feelings.

8.   Be sensitive to team member personal issues, but be careful:

While it’s important you’re sensitive to team member personal issues (this is part of being authentic), you need to be careful and not get “sucked in” to solving their problems.  Some people can be too “needy”.  Listen and try to make some relevant suggestions, but remember you’re not a psychologist.  This is work and if your team members need additional assistance suggest they seek outside counsel or contact your company’s employee assistance program (EAP).

9.   Train team members to do your job:

If team members request any developmental help be sure you do your best to get them the help they need.  This includes spending money on training.  The goal here is help train team members do your job; so you can have time to do your bosses job.  Everyone on the team should have the goal of continuous improvement so they can remain employable and take themselves to the next level of development.

10.  If your team doesn’t have the right skillsets – seek out new team players:

It’s your responsibility to make sure the team has all the right skillsets that get results.  Today’s marketplace is changing daily and your team needs to step up and consistently produce results for the company.  If your team is unwilling or unable to address any needed skill gaps you need to find people who have them.  Don’t be afraid to re-structure your team as needed.  Your boss is looking for you to get the job done.

Team leadership that produces results isn’t easy .  However, if you follow some or all the principles I’ve mentioned you will have a better chance of producing a team that can exceed your expectations.  Moreover, you will build relationships for life even after you’ve moved onto a new team.  You never know when you might need THEIR help down the road.  What are you doing today to produce a high performing team in your organization?  It should be one of your most important priorities.

Rick Steinbrenner
Chief Marketing Officer/Principal, Brand Marketing Advisors
www.globalbrandguy.com
The Global Brand Guy
 

Are Your New Products Concepts Attractive Enough?

Post first published 1/16/13 in the “MENG Blend” on the Marketing Executives Networking Group website – www.mengonline.com.  The destination site for leading marketing executives looking to stay ahead of the curve.  We have more than 1800 of the leading marketing minds in the world eager to meet, communicate, help and share our expertise.

Assessing New Products Concepts Attractiveness

It’s a common dilemma for most companies.  You have multiple new product ideas, but how do you know which ones are the most attractive in terms of consumer/customer interest, market size and growth and where you and your customers can make the most money?  In addition, how long would it take to bring the idea(s) to market and does the company have the right design and build capabilities to make it happen?  The key is to figure out an objective way to assess the attractiveness of alternative new product concepts so you can prioritize those first.  In this article we will discuss the different types of new products and the process you should use to prioritize your new product portfolio.

Many reasons exist on why you need to prioritize your new product portfolio.  Some are:

  • Not all new product programs are the same.  There is a big difference in developing simple model derivatives vs. “disruptive” new product ideas.  You need to tailor your new product process to match the types of new products being developed. 
  • You can’t do everything.  You have limited time, people and development dollar resources.
  • While you might have a great new product idea, new functional technologies might not be developed enough yet to have it work.
  • ŸYou want to be “first to market” vs. competitors.  Studies have consistently shown leading the market with new products is more preferable than following.
  • ŸYou need to make sure your new product development portfolio is aligned with business strategy and goals as well as being sufficient to meet new revenue growth expectations.

The first thing you should do is assess the strategic and technical difficulties in developing your new product ideas.  There are four major new product types groups:

Type 1:  Derivatives/new models of current product lines.  They are just additional product features, color, flavor, scent or size products etc.  Easiest to do and low risk.  Examples include: 10 vs. 12 cup coffee-makers, diet sodas or different cake mix flavors.

Type 2:  Line extensions:  These are current product lines moving into an adjacent category based on the same branding or product platform(s).  Examples include:  Clorox disinfectant wipes, Velvetta’s cheese skillet dinners, or Kellogg’s pop-tarts.

Type 3:  New products in company’s core category:  These include new platforms or delivery systems offering new innovations in the company’s core business.  Examples include: Tide detergent pods, DeWalt cordless power tools and General Electric’s compact fluorescent light bulbs (cfl).

Type 4:  New platform in a new category (to the company):  These concepts have the highest risk, but have the most business impact – i.e. game changers and/or market category creators.  Examples include: Swiffer quick cleaners, iphones/tablets and Keurig K-cup single serve coffeemakers.

These new product types have very different risk vs. reward profiles as conceptualized below:

New Product Types - Risk vs. Reward

Click On Image To Enlarge

Thus, it’s important to know the new product type you’re considering so you can more accurately assess its attractiveness to the company.  Then you need an objective way to assess the attractiveness of alternative concepts since people, time and dollar resources aren’t unlimited.  Fortunately, this step doesn’t need to be 100% accurate or highly complex.  A consistent qualitative ranking assessment will do just fine at this stage.

There are at least five major attractiveness criteria measures you should consider:

  1. Consumer Interest:       Is the concept unique?  Can consumers easily see demonstrable results?
  2. Design & Build Capabilities:  How easy is it to design/build?  Is engineering/R&D familiar with the  technologies involved?  Should you make the product or source it elsewhere?
  3. Market Size/Growth & Competitive Offerings:  How big is the market?  Is it growing and sustainable?  How many major competitors are out there      already?
  4. Financial:  What is the net margin $ potential?  Does the concept require substantial development dollars?  Will it require substantial marketing      communication dollars beyond the launch?
  5. Risk:  Is your concept patentable?  How long will it take to develop?  Will either qualitative and/or quantitative market research be required to help reduce  business risk?

You should weight these measures and combine them into a new product ranking assessment tool similar to the one below.

Concept Attractiveness Scoring Template

Click on Image To Enlarge

Then you grade each one of your initiatives and rank them high to low based on these concept attractiveness scores.  While you could use the above example, you should design your own new product ranking assessment tool consistent with your overall business model since attractiveness criteria can vary from industry to industry.

In sum, it’s not enough just to have great new product ideas.  You need to know what type of product it is and then objectively assess its appeal relative to multiple ideas.  You then need to prioritize your ideas so you can make sure your product portfolio is diversified similar to any financial investment.  This tool can help you and your company manage the “fuzzy front end” vs. it managing you.

Rick Steinbrenner
Chief Marketing Officer/Principal, Brand Marketing Advisors
www.globalbrandguy.com
A Consumer Brand & Product Marketer 

Digitizing Your Personal Brand Series – Part 1

Post first published 12/26/12 in the “MENG Blend” on the Marketing Executives Networking Group website – www.mengonline.com.  The destination site for leading marketing executives looking to stay ahead of the curve.  We have more than 1800 of the leading marketing minds in the world eager to meet, communicate, help and share our expertise.

Building Your Unique Personal Brand

As great marketers know, a clear and concise branding strategy is critical to successfully building a consumer/customer franchise.  However, it always amazes me how few marketers apply these important concepts to the building of their own professional/personal brand.  Building your own brand has never been more important – business cards, resumes and even Linked-in profiles simply don’t cut it anymore.  Moreover, with advances in CMS (content management systems) it’s easier and more cost effective than ever to build and manage your own website.  If used correctly, these tools can help you build your own personal brand awareness which can showcase what you can do to help solve employer’s/client’s problems.  In part one of this article I will briefly show how easily you can build a distinctive personal brand and in part two I will provide a step by step process on how you can communicate it via building your own professional website.

The major driver behind the need to identify your own brand is the fact career search has REALLY changed.  Negative marketplace dynamics, candidate/social media commoditization, and search engine UNDER-optimization makes it harder to stand out vs. the competition.  This is especially important for those who haven’t searched for a position/secured new clients over the past few years.  Factors behind this change include employers who REALLY want specific industry experience – and are not really interested in transferable skills anymore and most importantly your competition is working harder than ever to get marketplace visibility (source: Execunet). 

Career experts like Don Schwabel, William Arruda and even Tom Peters all talk about creating something called “Brand You” – messaging highlighting your key areas of distinction.  You can think about a personal brand in terms of a business’s hierarchy of needs as diagramed below:                  

Business Hierarchy Of Needs

As you can see focusing your communications is less on jobs and/or specific skills/experiences and more on results oriented performance critical for differentiation.  It essentially answers the question “Why I should hire you vs. someone else?”  To get started, you need to map out/identify your strategic or sustainable competitive advantage.  The process is briefly outlined below:

Personal Branding Processs

You first start with your core competencies – that is your problem, action, result stories (PAR) surrounding your key career accomplishments.  This process leads you to identifying your strategic or sustainable competitive advantage (SCA).  A strategic or sustainable competitive advantage consists of three elements.

  1. It’s something you exclusively have vs. others
  2. Your competition doesn’t have it (or don’t realize they have it)
  3. Your target companies want it.

If you can’t say you have all three elements, you need a plan to address this shortcoming.  You then still need to determine if your SCA addresses key industry needs or if you need to adjust it to make sure it’s relevant.  This will lead you to your final SCA which will drive development of your positioning statement.

Positioning is a concept first developed by Jack Trout and Al Ries – formerly of Trout & Ries – that originally developed this concept in the 1980’s.  In their book – “Positioning– The Battle For Your Mind” – they said positioning is: “not what you do to a product or service – it’s what you do to the prospect’s mind to CONDITION how he/she thinks about your product or service”.  This concept has been translated by others into a positioning statement template below:

To: TARGET MARKET, X (You) is a brand in the FRAME OF REFERENCE (usually industry) having a BENEFIT/POINT OF DIFFERENCE. Supported by the following reasons why:

a)

b)

c)

Below is an example of how this can be translated into a career positioning statement. How to develop your brand positioning statement

As you can see development of a personal brand positioning statement can be very powerful in communicating your key areas of distinction.  It helps you in fighting the battle for your employer’s/client’s share of mind.  It’s not a hard concept to grasp, however what’s hard is the kind of thinking required to make an effective positioning statement for yourself.  Unfortunately, what I observe with most people’s positioning statements (sometimes called an elevator pitch) is they try to be all things to all companies – generalists so to speak.  Companies are looking for exactly the opposite; they are looking for folks who have 1-2 key unique competencies vs. other choices they can make.  So I would argue the more specific your positioning statement is the better the chance for you to stand out vs. your competition. 

In my next article, I will discuss how you can take an effective personal brand/positioning statement and use the technology of the internet to increase your marketplace visibility with your own professional website.

Rick Steinbrenner
Chief Marketing Officer/Principal, Brand Marketing Advisors
www.globalbrandguy.com
The Global Brand Guy

Digitizing Your Personal Brand

According to most career experts, everyone needs a personal brand today to help differentiate themselves – especially in this competitive marketplace.  This first part of the presentation shows how consumer brands develop their branding and positioning and how it’s executed in their messaging.  A framework is then discussed to help individuals develop their own personal brand and messaging in the job search process.

In addition, you really need more than a business card/resume/linked in profile to be “found” on the internet these days – you need your own website.  The balance of the presentation then details a step by step process on how to develop your own professional website for the “non-technical” user.

(Note: this presentation include a you tube video by Tom Peters. In order to view the video, you will need to do three things.

1) Must have a live internet connection while viewing

2) Save & download the presentation.

3) Then view the presentation in slide show and enable the content when the security alert for macros and active X comes up – (this may or may not happen depending on your computers settings.)

Traditional Marketing is Dead – Bill Lee – HBR Blog

by Bill Lee | 3:00 PM August 9, 2012

Comments (527)

First, buyers are no longer paying much attention. Several studies have confirmed that in the “buyer’s decision journey,” traditional marketing communications just aren’t relevant. Buyers are checking out product and service information in their own way, often through the Internet, and often from sources outside the firm such as word-of-mouth or customer reviews. Traditional marketing — including advertising, public relations, branding and corporate communications — is dead.  Many people in traditional marketing roles and organizations may not realize they’re operating within a dead paradigm. But they are. The evidence is clear.

Second, CEOs have lost all patience. In a devastating 2011 study of 600 CEOs and decision makers by the London-based Fournaise Marketing Group, 73% of them said that CMOs lack business credibility and the ability to generate sufficient business growth, 72% are tired of being asked for money without explaining how it will generate increased business, and 77% have had it with all the talk about brand equity that can’t be linked to actual firm equity or any other recognized financial metric.

Third, in today’s increasingly social media-infused environment, traditional marketing and sales not only doesn’t work so well, it doesn’t make sense. Think about it: an organization hires people — employees, agencies, consultants, partners — who don’t come from the buyer’s world and whose interests aren’t necessarily aligned with his, and expects them to persuade the buyer to spend his hard-earned money on something. Huh? When you try to extend traditional marketing logic into the world of social media, it simply doesn’t work. Just ask Facebook, which finds itself mired in an ongoing debate about whether marketing on Facebook is effective.

In fact, this last is a bit of a red herring, because traditional marketing isn’t really working anywhere.

There’s a lot of speculation about what will replace this broken model — a sense that we’re only getting a few glimpses of the future of marketing on the margins. Actually, we already know in great detail what the new model of marketing will look like. It’s already in place in a number of organizations. Here are its critical pieces:

Restore community marketing.  Used properly, social media is accelerating a trend in which buyers can increasingly approximate the experience of buying in their local, physical communities. For instance, when you contemplate a major purchase, such as a new roof, a flat screen TV, or a good surgeon, you’re not likely to go looking for a salesperson to talk to, or to read through a bunch of corporate website content. Instead, you’ll probably ask neighbors or friends — your peer network — what or whom they’re using.

Companies should position their social media efforts to replicate as much as possible this community-oriented buying experience. In turn, social media firms, such as Facebook, should become expert at enabling this. They can do this by expanding the buyer’s network of peers who can provide trustworthy information and advice based on their own experience with the product or service.

For example, a new firm, Zuberance, makes it easy and enjoyable for a firm’s loyal customers to advocate for the firm on their social media platform of choice. At the moment one of these customers identifies himself as a “promoter” on a survey, they immediately see a form inviting them to write a review or recommendation on any of several social media sites. Once they do, the Zuberance platform populates it to the designated sites, and the promoter’s network instantly knows about his experience with the firm.

Find your customer influencers. Many firms spend lots of resources pursuing outside influencers who’ve gained following on the Web and through social media. A better approach is to find and cultivate customer influencers and give them something great to talk about. This requires a new concept of customer value that goes way beyond customer lifetime value (CLV), which is based only on purchases. There are many other measures of a customer’s potential value, beyond the money they pay you. For example, how large and strategic to your firm is the customer’s network? How respected is she?

One of Microsoft’s “MVP” (Most Valuable Professional) customers is known as Mr. Excel to his followers. On some days, his website gets more visits than Microsoft’s Excel page — representing an audience of obvious importance to Microsoft, which supports Mr. Excel’s efforts with “insider knowledge” and previews of new releases. In return, Mr. Excel and other MVPs like him are helping Microsoft penetrate new markets affordably.

Help them build social capital. Practitioners of this new, community-oriented marketing are also rethinking their customer value proposition for such MVP (or “Customer Champion” or “Rockstar”) customer advocates and influencers. Traditional marketing often tries to encourage customer advocacy with cash rewards, discounts or other untoward inducements. The new marketing helps its advocates and influencers create social capital: it helps them build their affiliation networks, increase their reputation and gives them access to new knowledge — all of which your customer influencers crave.

National Instruments used an especially creative approach with its customer influencers, who were mid-level IT managers at the companies they did business with. NI engaged with them by providing powerful research and financial proof points they could take to senior management, showing that NI solutions were creating strategic benefits. That got NI into the C-suite. It also increased the reputation of the mid-level advocates, who were seen as strategic thinkers bringing new ideas to senior management.

Get your customer advocates involved in the solution you provide. Perhaps the most spectacular example of this comes from the non-profit world. Some years ago, with the number of teen smokers nation-wide rising to alarming levels, the State of Florida thought anew about its decades-long effort to reduce the problem. What could be more difficult than convincing teen smokers to quit — a problem that Malcolm Gladwell had said couldn’t be solved. Using the techniques for building a community of peer influence, Florida solved it. They sought influential teen “customers” such as student leaders, athletes, and “cool kids,” who weren’t smoking or who wanted to quit — and instead of pushing a message at them, they asked for the students’ help and input.

Approached in this new way, some 600 teens attended a summit on teen smoking, where they told officials why anti-smoking efforts in the past hadn’t worked — dire warnings about the health consequences of smoking, or describing the habit as “being gross,” left them unimpressed. On the spot, the teens brainstormed a new approach: they were outraged by documents showing that tobacco company executives were specifically targeting teens to replace older customers who’d died (often from lung cancer). And so the teens formed a group called SWAT (Students Working Against Tobacco) who organized train tours and workshops, sold T-shirts and other appealing activities to take their message into local communities. The result: despite a vicious counterattack by Big Tobacco lobbying firms, teen smoking in Florida dropped by nearly half between 1998 and 2007 — by far the biggest success in anti-teen-smoking in history.

Put another way, Florida won half of the “non-buyers” of its anti-teen-smoking “product” away from its much bigger, much better funded competitor. They did so by tapping the best source of buyer motivation: peer influence.

So can you. Traditional marketing may be dead, but the new possibilities of peer influence-based, community-oriented marketing, hold much greater promise for creating sustained growth through authentic customer relationships.

Bill Lee is president of the Lee Consulting Group, Executive Director of the Summit on Customer Engagement, and author of The Hidden Wealth of Customers: Realizing the Untapped Value of Your Most Important Asset (HBR Press, June 2012).