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Tag Archives: Brand Marketing Advisors

Which Is Better? – Marketing or Unmarketing™

Post first published 4/2/13 in the “MENG Blend” on the Marketing Executives Networking Group website – www.mengonline.com.  The destination site for leading marketing executives looking to stay ahead of the curve.  We have more than 1800 of the leading marketing minds in the world eager to meet, communicate, help and share our expertise. 

Which is Better? – Marketing or Unmarketing™ 

Does Marketing Really Work?

Does branded marketing and/or national brands really work anymore? Some people don’t think so. Whatever your point of view is you can’t ignore this simple truth. The combination of retailer and manufacturer consolidation combined with shareholder pressure to have successive quarterly earnings growth has done a lot to commoditize consumer product businesses. This has led some consumer product companies to stop innovating/marketing altogether because some don’t see it working anymore. There are many reasons why, but here a few big ones:

Innovation activity has and will most likely continue to decline:

According to the Nielsen company (a major consumer products research firm), of the 11,000+ new products they’ve evaluated over last three years less than .5% of all new product introductions met their breakthrough innovation criteria for success – that’s only 34 new products! While it’s always been true only a small % of new products ever achieve commercial success even during good times, there’s no question companies have been dialing back new product programs at an ever increasing rate. Nielsen also found the total number of new product initiatives decreased 6% annually since 2008 in the consumer packaged goods sector. While some of this decline can be attributed to lower economic activity there can be little doubt companies are innovating less not more. What I’ve also personally noticed are companies have radically changed their new product initiative risk profiles due to continuing Wall Street pressures to have these programs payout in less than 12 months!!

Decreasing importance of “national” brands:

National or manufacturer brands are having a hard time holding their own these days. According to Nielsen and the PLMA, store brands now account for almost ~25% of ALL retail supermarket, drug chains and discount store sales and growing. They also state 80% of consumers now believe store brands’ quality is equal to/exceed that of their national brand counterparts. This has led to the “commoditization” of many product categories. In some categories, retailers have “kicked out” the national brands altogether in favor of their own brands. While I don’t believe store brands will ever be 100% of sales, what is true is that national brands share of retail sales is decreasing and will continue to do so in the future. This is clearly a competitive threat.

Consumers don’t really believe what brands say anymore:

According to the Futures Company, the global strategic insight and innovation consultancy, a poll of 28,000 adults in 21 markets found 86% thought big business maximized profits at the expense of customers and communities. In Jonathan Salem Baskin’s e-book “Branding still only works on Cattle”, he takes this fact one step further by saying – “Brands are suffering the same declines and shortfalls we’re seeing in corporate reputations. Trust is a synonym for BELIEF and perhaps the strongest indicator of PURCHASE INTENT and subsequent LOYALTY”. Branded marketing clearly has a integrity problem today leading more people choosing NOT TO BUY vs. buying brands that supposedly have the right feature/benefit package.

These factors and others have many now saying “Branded Marketing is Dead”. It’s obvious we need to come up with a new way of thinking about branded marketing for the 21st century.

How about Unmarketing™?
Mr. Baskin goes on to say in his e-book “the 21st century model for brands will shift the emphasis from getting consumers to say YES to entertaining but otherwise meaningless engagement, and engaging with them on substance to which they’re allowed to say NO”. This is because people don’t really want to be sold on anything anymore, they want products/services that will help solve their unique problems – even if it means you might not make a sale today.

On the sales side of things, Peter Bourke: Principal & Vice-President of The Complex Sale, Inc. – a sales leadership team consultancy (www.complexsale.com) – makes the argument sales teams (closely allied to marketing teams) needs to unsell in today’s marketplace “selling more by Unselling™” as he coins it. This is because selling has become what the buyer REALLY expects in a sales call. The problem is most buyers/clients don’t want to be sold. The goal should be to make the buyer more receptive because they don’t feel like they’re being sold. It might appear to be obvious, but many companies still resort to the “old” way of selling.

Old approach to making cold callsUnselling™ approach to cold calling
“I have a product/service that best fit your needs” (presumptive at best).“I have a product/service that MAY fit your needs and if you’ll allow me to ask a few brief questions about what/whom you’re using now I may help determine if my product/service is even worth your time evaluating.”

It’s funny; this selling approach has been used very successfully on the marketing side in the past. Please see the short video below on how 7Up developed and executed the “Uncola” campaign in the early 1970’s. It featured Geoffrey Holder before he played Punjab in “Annie,” as well as playing a supporting role as Baron Samedi in the 1973 James Bond 007 movie – “Live and Let Die”.

Case Study – 7Up – The UnCola


Geoffrey Holder – “Cola vs. Uncola Nuts”

As you can see the account team & creatives at J. Walter Thompson (7Up’s agency at the time) correctly identified a unique consumer solution – a clean, light, wet and wild refreshing soft drink that wasn’t a cola. It was also strategically correct since it allowed 7Up NOT directly compete against the soft drink giants – Coke & Pepsi. The result was increased sales and brand equity for 7Up.

Bottom Line:
It’s time for branded marketing to re-define itself. We need to start Unmarketing™ our initiatives/products focusing on a more collaborative approach helping consumers solve their problems – even it means we don’t sell anything today. This means creating programs and products that builds trust and credibility. I know this is a long term approach that might not payout in “10 minutes” as required by most Wall Street/Finance people. However, what’s the alternative – continue to do marketing the same old way and then say it doesn’t work? We need to break this self-fulfilling prophecy and really change the way we do branded marketing going forward. If we do this, I think we might find a new renaissance in marketing because it will “work” again. The question is: what are you doing in your organization to make this happen?

Rick Steinbrenner
Chief Marketing Officer/Principal, Brand Marketing Advisors
www.globalbrandguy.com
The Global Brand Guy

Digitizing Your Personal Brand Series – Part 1

Post first published 12/26/12 in the “MENG Blend” on the Marketing Executives Networking Group website – www.mengonline.com.  The destination site for leading marketing executives looking to stay ahead of the curve.  We have more than 1800 of the leading marketing minds in the world eager to meet, communicate, help and share our expertise.

Building Your Unique Personal Brand

As great marketers know, a clear and concise branding strategy is critical to successfully building a consumer/customer franchise.  However, it always amazes me how few marketers apply these important concepts to the building of their own professional/personal brand.  Building your own brand has never been more important – business cards, resumes and even Linked-in profiles simply don’t cut it anymore.  Moreover, with advances in CMS (content management systems) it’s easier and more cost effective than ever to build and manage your own website.  If used correctly, these tools can help you build your own personal brand awareness which can showcase what you can do to help solve employer’s/client’s problems.  In part one of this article I will briefly show how easily you can build a distinctive personal brand and in part two I will provide a step by step process on how you can communicate it via building your own professional website.

The major driver behind the need to identify your own brand is the fact career search has REALLY changed.  Negative marketplace dynamics, candidate/social media commoditization, and search engine UNDER-optimization makes it harder to stand out vs. the competition.  This is especially important for those who haven’t searched for a position/secured new clients over the past few years.  Factors behind this change include employers who REALLY want specific industry experience – and are not really interested in transferable skills anymore and most importantly your competition is working harder than ever to get marketplace visibility (source: Execunet). 

Career experts like Don Schwabel, William Arruda and even Tom Peters all talk about creating something called “Brand You” – messaging highlighting your key areas of distinction.  You can think about a personal brand in terms of a business’s hierarchy of needs as diagramed below:                  

Business Hierarchy Of Needs

As you can see focusing your communications is less on jobs and/or specific skills/experiences and more on results oriented performance critical for differentiation.  It essentially answers the question “Why I should hire you vs. someone else?”  To get started, you need to map out/identify your strategic or sustainable competitive advantage.  The process is briefly outlined below:

Personal Branding Processs

You first start with your core competencies – that is your problem, action, result stories (PAR) surrounding your key career accomplishments.  This process leads you to identifying your strategic or sustainable competitive advantage (SCA).  A strategic or sustainable competitive advantage consists of three elements.

  1. It’s something you exclusively have vs. others
  2. Your competition doesn’t have it (or don’t realize they have it)
  3. Your target companies want it.

If you can’t say you have all three elements, you need a plan to address this shortcoming.  You then still need to determine if your SCA addresses key industry needs or if you need to adjust it to make sure it’s relevant.  This will lead you to your final SCA which will drive development of your positioning statement.

Positioning is a concept first developed by Jack Trout and Al Ries – formerly of Trout & Ries – that originally developed this concept in the 1980’s.  In their book – “Positioning– The Battle For Your Mind” – they said positioning is: “not what you do to a product or service – it’s what you do to the prospect’s mind to CONDITION how he/she thinks about your product or service”.  This concept has been translated by others into a positioning statement template below:

To: TARGET MARKET, X (You) is a brand in the FRAME OF REFERENCE (usually industry) having a BENEFIT/POINT OF DIFFERENCE. Supported by the following reasons why:

a)

b)

c)

Below is an example of how this can be translated into a career positioning statement. How to develop your brand positioning statement

As you can see development of a personal brand positioning statement can be very powerful in communicating your key areas of distinction.  It helps you in fighting the battle for your employer’s/client’s share of mind.  It’s not a hard concept to grasp, however what’s hard is the kind of thinking required to make an effective positioning statement for yourself.  Unfortunately, what I observe with most people’s positioning statements (sometimes called an elevator pitch) is they try to be all things to all companies – generalists so to speak.  Companies are looking for exactly the opposite; they are looking for folks who have 1-2 key unique competencies vs. other choices they can make.  So I would argue the more specific your positioning statement is the better the chance for you to stand out vs. your competition. 

In my next article, I will discuss how you can take an effective personal brand/positioning statement and use the technology of the internet to increase your marketplace visibility with your own professional website.

Rick Steinbrenner
Chief Marketing Officer/Principal, Brand Marketing Advisors
www.globalbrandguy.com
The Global Brand Guy